Niels Strøyer Christophersen: Danish design “is a way of thinking and acting in our everyday life”

April 8th, 2020
Written by:
Nikolai Kotlarczyk

Niels Strøyer Christophersen, owner and founder of Frama. Photo courtesy of Frama.

Niels Strøyer Christophersen, founder of Frama, is one of the three members in the new Curator Advisory Board for The Mindcraft Project 2020.

Through his ever-evolving design house, Niels Strøyer Christophersen is helping to redefine the business of design in Denmark today. Ever since Frama’s inception in 2011, a growing group of like-minded creatives have been pushing their unique view on how we live into areas not normally associated with a design brand. From furniture and product design, fashion, scents, books and even entire kitchens, the unmistakable essence of a Frama product or space can be seen through an honest and raw approach to materiality and form.

Frama’s headquarters in Copenhagen is housed in the historic St. Paul’s Apotek from 1878. Photo by Claus Troelsgaard.

Entering St. Pauls Apotek on Fredericiagade – Frama’s headquarters only minutes away from Copenhagen’s bustling centre, Christophersen and his team have created a space that is both contemporary while maintaining the essence of its former life. The original glass panelled ceiling and timber cabinetry can be seen next to a growing range of furniture and lighting by some of Denmark’s most intriguing designers. Nothing is done in haste – their catalogue has been built up naturally and in turn exudes a sense of timelessness, as Christophersen explains;

“We are creating a culture and spatial experiences around our ideology and approach to the design business. We believe in permanency, not seasons and trends – which is the complete opposite of the commercial mainstream companies on the market…”

Frama Studio Store Copenhagen. Photo by Maureen M Evans.

Frama’s unique approach to commercial design has led to admires both near and far, and an expanding list of collaborators. Closer to home this has included developing the St. Pauls Apothecary Collection with Lena Norling and creating the Long Table Gatherings with selected local chefs and restaurants. Abroad their paired back aesthetics have reached all the way to Mexico through the design of ENO restaurant alongside chef Enrique Olvera, and their products can be seen in partnership with London based House of Grey. No matter where in the world Frama and Christophersen take their vision, it all stems from a close connection to their Danish roots.

“Contemporary Danish design continues to be more than just product design, instead it is a way of thinking and acting in our everyday life. Danish design is embodied in our daily lives because it is a natural part of our environment: whether private, work or leisure surroundings.”

Frama Interior Architecture for ENO restaurant of Chef Enrique Olvera, Mexico City. Photo by Maureen M Evans (courtesy of Grupo Olvera).

There is no other design brand today that demonstrates this holistic approach to all facets of product, lifestyle and spatial design. Christophersen’s own apartment has opened its doors on many occasions and acts as a trial ground for interior concepts and approaches to space and material. This open approach to design gave birth to the Frama Studio Collection, a line of free-standing kitchen units and cabinets, and features many sculptural moments that have ongoing influence on the Frama permanent collection.

Frama Studio Kitchen. Photo by Michael Rygaard.

Heading into 2020 and beyond, Frama and Christophersen will continue to explore new design fields and collaborations both close to home and abroad. A natural growth of their collection of sophisticated interior products will be viewed alongside upcoming collections in close contact with the Chinese fashion house Uma Wang and the Japanese footwear and accessory brand Hender Scheme. Extending his Danish roots into even more corners of the globe, we cannot wait to see how Christophersen’s unique design language continues to grow and push the commercial design industry into the future.

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